Posts Tagged ‘zlob trojan’

Zlob – Evil Predator From Outer Space!

I wish it were true. Then we could call the Force to get rid of it! Unfortunately Zlob is a Trojan horse disguised as an essential video codec file that you need if you want to watch certain video content on the web. With the ever-increasing popularity of video on the internet these days, many people find themselves saddled with this horror in spite of probably knowing better. Zlob was first discovered in late 2005, and has been around in various forms since then. There are dozens of variants of this trojan, and more are being found all the time.

Zlob trojans are malware devices, close kin to the Vundo trojans that gives the attacking person or computer the ability to take over your computer remotely. It changes your computers setting and modifies files, rerouting your internet traffic through their server.  Zlob starts when you start up Windows, and disguises its nefarious intentions by injecting code into explorere.exe. It then alows you to make remote connections and then proceeds to download and install additional software and in short, hijack your entire computer. Needless to say, Zlob can be very vicious.

Once it’s in there, Zlob displays popups that look amazingly similar to real Microsoft Windows warning popups, telling you that your computer is riddled with spyware, viruses and more. Their aim is to get you to click on these popups, pay for and download their useless “fix”, all the while offloading more and more problems onto your computer, not to mention your wallet!

Ultimately you are left with a machine that shuts down seemingly randomly and reboots with confusing text messages. One of the newer variations of Zlob can set up residence on your Wi-Fi router by going through a list of common default username and password combos, (like “admin,admin”) which many of us  don’t ever change. This is, by the way, one of the better ways to help keep your sensitive information safer, by regularly changing these. It’s tedious, but necessary.

So what exactly did you do to get into this mess and how can you avoid it in the future? The usual way revolves around your attempts to download a video onto your PC, and you are then confronted with a screen that informs you that a special codec is required to actually view the video. So, you install the required “codec”. They may even ask you, (in the name of fake legitimacy!) to read and accept an End User License Agreement (EULA), which of course you neither read nor understand. The viola, then download proceeds and your problems intensify.

With the ever-growing dependence on video as a means of communicating on the Web, and our laxity in making sure just what we’re putting into our systems makes this an easy task for Zlob Trojans and their counterparts to thrive and multiply. Used with an enticing message, often deployed through e-cards, instant messages and other mediums we want to trust, Zlobs prey on our thirst for more information, entertainment and lack of vigilance.

The best way to ensure that you don’t have to deal with Zlobs is to make sure you are using a quality anti-spyware and anti-malware program such as Spyzooka to keep the Zlobs away!

Zlob – Evil Predator From Outer Space!

I wish it were true. Then we could call the Force to get rid of it! Unfortunately Zlob is a Trojan horse disguised as an essential video codec file that you need if you want to watch certain video content on the web. With the ever-increasing popularity of video on the internet these days, many people find themselves saddled with this horror in spite of probably knowing better. Zlob was first discovered in late 2005, and has been around in various forms since then. There are dozens of variants of this trojan, and more are being found all the time.

Zlob trojans are malware devices, close kin to the Vundo trojans that gives the attacking person or computer the ability to take over your computer remotely. It changes your computers setting and modifies files, rerouting your internet traffic through their server.  Zlob starts when you start up Windows, and disguises its nefarious intentions by injecting code into explorere.exe. It then alows you to make remote connections and then proceeds to download and install additional software and in short, hijack your entire computer. Needless to say, Zlob can be very vicious.

Once it’s in there, Zlob displays popups that look amazingly similar to real Microsoft Windows warning popups, telling you that your computer is riddled with spyware, viruses and more. Their aim is to get you to click on these popups, pay for and download their useless “fix”, all the while offloading more and more problems onto your computer, not to mention your wallet!

Ultimately you are left with a machine that shuts down seemingly randomly and reboots with confusing text messages. One of the newer variations of Zlob can set up residence on your Wi-Fi router by going through a list of common default username and password combos, (like “admin,admin”) which many of us  don’t ever change. This is, by the way, one of the better ways to help keep your sensitive information safer, by regularly changing these. It’s tedious, but necessary.

So what exactly did you do to get into this mess and how can you avoid it in the future? The usual way revolves around your attempts to download a video onto your PC, and you are then confronted with a screen that informs you that a special codec is required to actually view the video. So, you install the required “codec”. They may even ask you, (in the name of fake legitimacy!) to read and accept an End User License Agreement (EULA), which of course you neither read nor understand. The viola, then download proceeds and your problems intensify.

With the ever-growing dependence on video as a means of communicating on the Web, and our laxity in making sure just what we’re putting into our systems makes this an easy task for Zlob Trojans and their counterparts to thrive and multiply. Used with an enticing message, often deployed through e-cards, instant messages and other mediums we want to trust, Zlobs prey on our thirst for more information, entertainment and lack of vigilance.

The best way to ensure that you don’t have to deal with Zlobs is to make sure you are using a quality anti-spyware and anti-malware program such as Spyzooka to keep the Zlobs away!

Zlob – Evil Predator From Outer Space!

I wish it were true. Then we could call the Force to get rid of it! Unfortunately Zlob is a Trojan horse disguised as an essential video codec file that you need if you want to watch certain video content on the web. With the ever-increasing popularity of video on the internet these days, many people find themselves saddled with this horror in spite of probably knowing better. Zlob was first discovered in late 2005, and has been around in various forms since then. There are dozens of variants of this trojan, and more are being found all the time.

Zlob trojans are malware devices, close kin to the Vundo trojans that gives the attacking person or computer the ability to take over your computer remotely. It changes your computers setting and modifies files, rerouting your internet traffic through their server.  Zlob starts when you start up Windows, and disguises its nefarious intentions by injecting code into explorere.exe. It then alows you to make remote connections and then proceeds to download and install additional software and in short, hijack your entire computer. Needless to say, Zlob can be very vicious.

Once it’s in there, Zlob displays popups that look amazingly similar to real Microsoft Windows warning popups, telling you that your computer is riddled with spyware, viruses and more. Their aim is to get you to click on these popups, pay for and download their useless “fix”, all the while offloading more and more problems onto your computer, not to mention your wallet!

Ultimately you are left with a machine that shuts down seemingly randomly and reboots with confusing text messages. One of the newer variations of Zlob can set up residence on your Wi-Fi router by going through a list of common default username and password combos, (like “admin,admin”) which many of us  don’t ever change. This is, by the way, one of the better ways to help keep your sensitive information safer, by regularly changing these. It’s tedious, but necessary.

So what exactly did you do to get into this mess and how can you avoid it in the future? The usual way revolves around your attempts to download a video onto your PC, and you are then confronted with a screen that informs you that a special codec is required to actually view the video. So, you install the required “codec”. They may even ask you, (in the name of fake legitimacy!) to read and accept an End User License Agreement (EULA), which of course you neither read nor understand. The viola, then download proceeds and your problems intensify.

With the ever-growing dependence on video as a means of communicating on the Web, and our laxity in making sure just what we’re putting into our systems makes this an easy task for Zlob Trojans and their counterparts to thrive and multiply. Used with an enticing message, often deployed through e-cards, instant messages and other mediums we want to trust, Zlobs prey on our thirst for more information, entertainment and lack of vigilance.

The best way to ensure that you don’t have to deal with Zlobs is to make sure you are using a quality anti-spyware and anti-malware program such as Spyzooka to keep the Zlobs away!

Zlob Trojan Removal

Zlob Trojans are some of the most insidious Trojans out there.  If you’ve ever tried to watch video from a web site, only to be informed you needed to download a special “codec”, then you’ve probably run into a Zlob Trojan.  They are insidious.

They’re even worse because they do a really good job of pretending like they are legitimate software.  They’ll often have fake end-user license agreements to that they’ll seem like the real deal.  But really, these are just there to fool the unsuspecting user into downloading malicious software.

Sometimes the agreement will tell you exactly what you’re about to download, but in the kind of shifty language where you can’t really know the maliciousness of what you’re downloading is.

Once you’ve downloaded this software, you’ll start to see lots of adware.  You’ll get screens taking over your desktop, posing as security warnings.  You’ll probably even have pop-up windows telling you your system is infected.  (“ActiveX Object Error” is one common message that comes up.)

Of course, you’ll be instructed to buy a specific kind of “anti-spyware”, or at least run a check with it, in order to “fix” your computer.

But this is far from the end of things.  Zlob Trojans keep on downloading adware and rogue anti-spyware.  You’ll just get more and more “error–run scan with X software” messages.  And they’ll look more and more legitimate–much of this kind of malicious adware and rogue anti-spyware is designed to look either like a Windows security alert, or else like a real and legitimate anti-spyware program.

Zlob Trojans uses the increasing popularity of internet video to make potential victims of us all.  This kind of malicious adware doesn’t just come from video sites.  Online greeting card sites, music download sites, and even instant messengers can transmit this kind of malicious software.

So what can you do to protect yourself?

Read any end-user license agreement you are shown.  The time you take may seem irritating, but it’s worth it.  Real agreements, while sometimes long, are easy to understand.  The agreements for this kind of malicious adware generally are not.

Verify what you’re downloading.  Before you download any kind of video codec (or any other executable file you’ve never heard of), make sure you know exactly what it is.  Google it, use an online virus scanner (or your own–you really should have at least one spyware checker).  Find a good security support forum and make sure it has a search function.

If even one of these sources says the file is questionable, you probably shouldn’t download.  If all three tell you that, you definitely want to keep it off your computer.

Use up to date spyware protection.  In today’s day and age, this is absolutely essential.  Make sure you’ve got an legitimate anti-spyware program (i.e. one that you chose–not one that downloaded itself and then expected you to buy the full version), update it daily, and use it!

Zlob Trojan Exposed?

The ZLOB family of Trojan horses was first detected in late 2005, and since then this nasty bunch has become ever-more malicious, difficult to detect and intelligent — at least as far as malware can be “smart.”

It can be difficult to avoid ZLOB Trojans, particularly if you are prone to downloading video files and other goodies that often require the installation of an additional codec before you can access them. ZLOBs often hide behind legitimate-seeming websites, posing as codecs that you must install before a video or song will play.

Always be wary of installing any elements onto your computer unless you know the site is a trusted source. It’s a good idea to do a quick Web search and read about an unknown site before you download anything from them. If they’re hiding malware, no doubt someone has already been burned and posted information to that effect online.

Like other malware, ZLOBs access your hard drive and then disguise themselves as beneficial software — or, if they are more advanced — they simply don’t appear at all during a virus scan.

What is a Zlob?

If you’ve been unfortunate enough to be targeted by a ZLOB Trojan, there are several things that you might start to see on your computer. One of the main functions a ZLOB performs is downloading and installing other malicious programs and adware. Often, companies that produce pop-up ads and other adware will pay the creator of a ZLOB to download their software to infected computers.

In the past, these were usually adult-themed websites, but today it could be anything from a website about network marketing to rogue anti-spyware offering to clean your computer. These are particularly ill-intentioned — pop-up ads that inform you that your computer is infected with spyware and offer to run a free scan, then begin installing their malicious programs under that pretense.

ZLOBs are also able to hijack and redirect your browser to a website of their choosing. Imagine your child researching wolverines for a science project and ending up (to their shock) looking at an X-rated website.

Possibly worse, ZLOBs will download and install keylogging spyware and other invasive malware to keep track of what you’re doing, the sites you visit, and even complete financial transactions that you complete online. That means that every time you use a credit card online or enter a password, someone at another computer could be accessing that information to use at their whim.

How can I remove ZLOB?

As with most spyware invasions, ZLOBs are difficult to clear out of your computer — the first step is finding out you’ve even been infected. Many new ZLOB variations are difficult to isolate, even with anti-spyware and anti-virus software.

Finding a reputable website that reviews and sells anti-spyware, anti-virus and anti-spam software is absolutely critical in the Information Age. Look around at reviews of anti-spyware software and be sure you are getting a solid program, preferably with automatic updates and a high user rating. It’s best to find a program with good customer service — preferably a 24-hour phone line or chat system that will allow you to communicate with a live human being, not depend upon FAQs and help documents that may or may not address your question.

If you want to try to rid your computer of a ZLOB on your own, run a search for various files hidden in your hard drive, such as nvctri.exe and msmsgs.exe, among others. DLL errors may be found, as well as other temporary files and .tlb extensions. If you’re not extremely computer-savvy, it’s best to allow an anti-spyware program try to get rid of ZLOBs and any other malware the Trojan might have installed on your machine. If all else fails, take your computer to a computer repair store and let them handle it. You’ll save hours of frustration and avoid deleting beneficial files that are necessary to run your operating system.

Removing ZLOB Before It’s Too Late

If you’ve noticed your computer acting particularly sluggish… or you’ve been bombarded with pop-up ads… or your browser is doing things you don’t want it to do, then it’s definitely time to purchase, download and install some up-to-date anti-spyware software. It could be a ZLOB Trojan, it could be adware, but it’s almost certainly some kind of infection — and you want to take care of it right away.

After you’ve run your initial scans and your computer shows up infection-free, always be sure to keep your anti-spyware updates current. As always, install a firewall and teach family members how to be smart when downloading music, videos  or games. Computer problems cost time and money — and often can result in lost work and wages for those who rely on their computers to earn a living. Don’t mess around. Protect your family with an anti-spyware program that you know you can trust.

 

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